Poor Lighting Results in Eye Strain

February 2, 2016

Eye Strain

Poor lighting, resulting in eye strain, is a common complaint in the work place. But did you know that this can also be a problem at home? The lighting in various task areas of your home such as the kitchen, laundry or bathroom, also needs to be bright enough to work comfortably in. But there is more to consider.

We all experience changes to our eyes as we get older. Many people notice a deterioration of their near-sight vision some time in their 40’s. To see the same degree of detail, research has shown that a person in their 60’s requires two to five times more light than a 20 year old person. Eye strain, caused by poor lighting, can lead to poor concentration and decreased productivity, as well as headache, fatigue, tension, neck pain and even illness.

When building, renovating or replacing light fixtures in your home, give very careful consideration to lighting each space for it’s intended use, but also keeping in mind your eyes changing light requirement needs in the future. Lighting dimmers are an excellent addition to areas where multiple light levels are needed in multi function rooms such as dens, family/flex rooms, or dining rooms.

Our electricians will be able to advise you on some excellent options. Fixture placement, as well as color temperature, wattage, LED, Halogen or Incandescent technology all have their specific uses and we would like to help you find the perfect solution to your lighting needs.

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